Re-releasing the 2006 Riesling

We’re getting ready to re-release the 2006 Riesling….take note….

The wine received gold medals from The Orange County Fair and Critics’ Challenge.

Eric Asimov in The New York Times, in a profile of the winery on August 8, 2007, wrote:

We tasted five rieslings, from 2006 back to 1993, and it was fascinating to see how the wines evolved.  The ’06 was fresh and young, dry and tasting of citrus and flowers, with the unchanneled energy of a puppy.

https://dinersjournal.blogs.nytimes.com/2007/08/08/mountain-men/

The Wine Enthusiast‘s review (appearing in the September 2007 issue):

92 points: Doesn’t say “dry” on the label, like so many others do, but it really is basically dry, which allows the palate to savor the pure fruit of the grape and the beautifully crisp acids.  This really is one of the most balanced Rieslings in California, with a slate and petrol edge to the green apple, pineapple, nectarine and wildflower flavors.  If you like aging your whites, it should effortlessly glide through the next 10 years in a cool cellar.

https://www.winemag.com/buying-guide/smith-madrone-2006-riesling-napa-spring-mountain/

In the August 2007 issue of The Wine News:

93 points, Editors’ Choice: Enticing mineral-tinged aromas of white peach, shy petrol and dried apricot.  Full bodied with brisk acidity, the wine is fairly bursting with luscious apricot and peach fruit edged with crushed stone minerality and a subtle undertone of tropical fruit, showing fine depth of flavor and excellent acid balance, finishing with a hint of white grapefruit.

 

Author: corkingnapa

Julie Ann Kodmur is a second-generation Californian who was born in San Francisco and grew up in La Jolla. As an eighth grader she was the runner-up in the state spelling bee. She’s lived in Italy and New York and now lives in the Napa Valley with her family. She is a marketing and publicity consultant in the wine industry. Her business life can be seen at http://www.julieannkodmur.com. This is the home for the overflow. The ‘title’ is a reference to a sculpture honoring an Argentinean journalist who practiced his craft in the 1930s before literally dying for his words. No such drama here, just hopefully some provocative fun.